Let us share wisdom with each other.

In the midst of uncertainty, we’re heartened to see examples of small and large kindness among friends and strangers. We know a little bit about healthy communities; they’re created by people working together on a common goal.

During the Capitol Play Project, we met many smart, dedicated and media-shy civil servants who are working right now to keep us all healthy. Thank you.

WHAT WE’RE DOING
We’ll be postponing the Incarceration Play Project until December 2020.

The Good News is that we have all the elements of the show ready to go–amazing community and professional cast, confirmed location to perform, a script, and the necessary funds in the bank. So, while the show is on hold for now, the show will go on. We promise that these important stories will be told.

We’re also able to continue a lot of our other work–including with illustrator Becca Hart and others to illuminate community stories in new media. Our ensemble continues to be employed making video content and staying connected with our diverse community cast.

Check out our new video series of wisdom learned from our Incarceration community cast.

Also, stay tuned for an exciting announcement about a new series of short play commissions about what our future community looks like, and where and how they will be performed.

WHAT YOU CAN DO

“This is not a matter of not following the law, it is a greater matter of saving lives. In Minnesota, we do not have the death penalty, and no one should be subjected to death by incarceration with COVID-19.”
— Michele Livingston, BRIDGE family Network Advocate (and IPP community cast member).

Both people who are currently incarcerated and the people who work with them are trapped in a scary situation where COVID-19 can spread quickly. Please consider lending your voice to common sense measures that will help alleviate the dangers faced by inmates, their families, and Department of Corrections employees.

As an arts organization, we are also acutely aware of the financial challenges that have struck our friends who are freelance workers, independent contractors, and small business owners. If you are one of those people, you may find these resources helpful. If you are able to, you might consider helping artists in one or more of these ways.

Over the last five years, we’ve learned a lot from you about how to confront adversity (like the quote below from an Overachievers Web Series story circle).

Find us on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter where we’ll be resharing some of this wisdom, perspective, story, and odd, fun distractions.